Active Vista Resistance in Memory

DEKADA ‘70

Director: Chito S. Roño

Synopsis: 

The Bartolomes, a simple middle-class family gravely suffered during the 1970's when the President declared Martial Law. Before that era, the couple Julian and Amanda Bartolome gave freedom to their five all male children Jules, Gani, Eman, Jason, and Bingo. But during the 70s,  Jules becomes engrossed in joining the anti-regime groups and later on joins NPA. Gani joins the United States Navy. Eman regularly writes illicit writings against the government. Jason gets killed by corrupt policemen, while Bingo, the youngest, remains innocent through all the chaos. This family does not openly deal with the oppressive government but is struggling to keep their family intact despite their distinct differences.

About the Filmmaker: 

Chito S. Roño  is a Filipino writer, producer, and director. He is known for his expansive vision and special-effects-heavy films. He  finished his undergraduate degree in Broadcasting at the University of the Philippines where he also started his initial training in film. He took up further studies at the New School for Social Research in New York City and a scriptwriting course at the Grey Film Atelier in upstate New York. He also enrolled under a cinematography course at the Centro Statele di Cinematografia e Film in Rome.

Roño received wide acclaim for his debut film Private Show (1986), winning awards from both the local critics’ group and the entertainment press. This was followed with more different projects ranging from drama in Narito Ang Puso, (1992) to musical in Sige, Ihataw Mo, (1994) from period political thriller in Eskapo, (1995) to horror in Patayin Sa Sindak Si Barbara, 1995 and action in Dahas, (1995). 

Awards: 

Netpac Award - Special Mention, Cinemanila International Film Festival 2003 | Best Story and Best Production, FAMAS Awards 2003 |Best Picture and Best Screenplay, Gawad Urian 2003 | Best Film, Best Screenplay, and Best Achievement in Sound and Aural Orchestration, Young Critics Circle 2003




KAKABAKABA KA BA?

Director: Mike De Leon

Synopsis: 

As he arrives home from Japan, Johnny unknowingly smuggles in high-grade opium via an unassuming audio cassette. Japanese gangsters go after him and his friends to take back their goods. Johnny's group takes refuge in a church in Baguio, but there they discover that the priests and nuns there are fakes and actually in league with the Japanese. Adding to the mayhem is the Chinese mafia, which have agenda of their own that pits them against the Japanese. Appropriately, hijinks ensue in a battle cum musical extravaganza.

About the Filmmaker:

Mike De Leon is a renowned Filipino film director, cinematographer, scriptwriter, and film producer best known for Batch ’81, Maynila sa Mga Kuko ng Liwanag and Bayaning 3rd World. In 1975, De Leon established the Cinema Artists Philippines and produced Lino Brocka’s Maynila sa mga Kuko ng Liwanag, while also acting as the film’s cinematographer, where he was awarded for best cinematography by the Filipino Academy of Movie Arts and Sciences [FAMAS]. De Leon’s films are a full reflection of the Filipino psyche that seeks answers on social class belonging, political absurdities, and fragmentations in various forms. Through the years, his films have found their place as cinematic masterpieces in the Philippine History of Filmography. In 2018, Citizen Jake marked Mike De Leon’s return to cinema after a two-decade-long hiatus.

Awards: 

Best Direction, Best Editing, Best Music, and Best Sound, Gawad Urian 1981 | Best Editing and Best Sound, FAMAS Awards 1981




HIMALA

Director: Ishmael Bernal

Synopsis: 

Village girl Elsa witnesses the apparition of the Virgin Mary. People throng to the remote village to witness the phenomenon. She is then discovered to be pregnant and is believed to be having an immaculate conception.

About the Filmmaker:

Ishmael Bernal (30 September 1938 – 2 June 1996) was hailed as “The Genius of Philippine Cinema.”  His art extends beyond the confines of aesthetics. He was known for his groundbreaking films that provoke dialogues and social commentaries on the existing realities and struggle of the Filipino. Among his notable films are Pahiram ng Isang Umaga (1989), Broken Marriage (1983), City After Dark (1980), and Nunal sa Tubig (1976).

Awards: 

Best Picture, Best Director, Best in Screenplay, Best in Editing, Best in Cinematography, and Best in Art Direction, Metro Manila Film Festival 1982 | Best Picture and Best in Screenplay, Catholic Mass Media Awards 1982



 

MORAL

Director: Marilou Diaz-Abaya

Synopsis: 

Joey, Kathy, Sylvia, and Maritess are not only classmates - they are the best of friends. Joey is a drug user who sleeps around. Kathy is a mediocre singer who will stop at nothing to fulfill her dreams of going big-time. Sylvia is a liberated woman who finds security in the love of her ex-husband who is now living in with another man. Maritess plays the role of a conventional housewife who is reduced to a baby-making machine. In the span of three years - from 1979 to 1982 - the film traces the lives of these four women through their seemingly desperate but also interwoven experiences and in their attempts to resolve their individual problems are mirrored the different faces of the woman in our society today.

About the Filmmaker:

Marilou Diaz-Abaya (March 30, 1955- October 8, 2012) was a Filipina multi-award winning film director. She was the founder and president of the Marilou Díaz-Abaya Film Institute and Arts Center, a film school based in Antipolo City, Philippines. She was the director of the 1998 film José Rizal (1998), a biographical film on the Philippines' national hero. She was part of the Second Golden Age of Philippine Cinema.

Awards: 

Best Screenplay, Metro Manila Film Festival 1982 | Best Supporting Actor, FAMAS Awards 1983 | Best Supporting Actress, FAMAS Awards 1983



 

ORO, PLATA, MATA

Director: Peque Gallaga

Synopsis: 

Set in the milieu of an impending world war, the insouciant Filipino aristocracy is oblivious of the forthcoming danger. They scorn the Japanese capability against the formidable Americans. But panic grips everyone when the news of the fall of Corregidor comes, except the knowledgeable Don Claudio Ojeda who remains sensible. The Ojeda family evacuates to Hacienda Lorenzo, home to a landed family friend in Negros, where they feel safe to continue their nonchalance while playing the mahjong. But soon the invading Japanese army arrives driving them into the mountains. Still, they try to hang on to their privileged life without realizing that all are equal in time of war. Meanwhile, Lorenzo's often berated subservient and former field supervisor has turned bandit and, with his men, divests them of their valuables, food and chastity. Soon, they realize that war can bring out the animal instinct in man.

About the Filmmaker:

Peque Gallaga (August 25, 1943 – May 7, 2020) obtained his bachelor's degree from the University of St. La Salle, Bacolod. As a student, he was known for his active participation in various school presentations as a director of different house plays and barkada skits. He started his career in the film industry as a production designer of 1976 movie Ganito Kami Noon, Paano Kayo Ngayon? 

Peque bagged the Best Director Award at the 1996 Metro Manila Film Festival for his movie Magic Temple. In 2015, he organized his first solo art exhibit entitled "Gray Matters" featuring the young kids of his hometown, Negros.

Awards: 

Best Picture, Best Direction, Best Cinematography, Best Production Design, Best Musical Score, and Best Sound, Gawad Urian 1982 | Best Production Design, Luna Awards 1982